Friday, 27 September 2013

Recipe: Roast Chicken


a few thoughts 
Sheila Hamilton of Sunworks Organic
Farm shows off one of her delicious,
free- range chickens.
This blog entry marks the last recipe of the market season as Wednesday saw our market come to the end of its third successful season. In preparation for winter, I thought I'd share one of our family's favourite recipes. I make this one at home about once a week or so in the cooler months, depending on what's going on with our evenings. And for our family of 4, we usually get two meals and some sandwiches or meat for salads out of it.

Roasting a chicken is one of the simplest things to do in the home kitchen. It sends a wonderful aroma
through the house. And it creates the kind of meal that brings families together, gathered around a beautiful heaping platter of delicious food. We're talking movie dinners here... you know what I mean... the ones you typically see on the silver screen where parents and kids talk and share stories about their day. The kind where people relax over a good food and with good company and really enjoy themselves. Yup, this recipe can do that.

But before I share it, I have a confession to make: I have tried this recipe with both a Costco roasting chicken (sorry!) and a Sunworks Organic Farm chicken. Though the price was far greater with the farmers' market chicken, the taste and texture were out of this world and far, far better than the Costco chicken. I also found that when roasting the costco chicken, my roasting pan was filled with a good inch of liquid at the end of the roasting process, and the bird had shrunk noticeably in size. Not so with the organic Sunworks chicken. So though the price was 2-3 times more for the organic farmers' market chicken, the end result was a bird that was far more tender, tasty and flavourful and that lasted  two to two and a half meals for a family of four, rather than a single meal with the less flavour-filled Costco chicken. So getting my roasting bird at Costco was most certainly not the deal I thought it would be.
One other thing to note: what you might not know is that Sunworks sells a case of ten chickens at a considerable discount. If you have the freezer space to hold 10 birds, this deal is well worth the trip to the market. You just have to order them a week ahead of time, using their online site www.sunworksfarm.com, and come early to get them before the crowds line up at their booths for their regular purchases. A small price of inconvenience to pay for a tremendous deal, I think. During the winter, I pick them up at the Old Strathcona Market before 8am, but between May and October, they can be purchased and picked up at our Southwest Edmonton Market.

balsamic roast chicken
Using balsamic vinegar on the outside of the chicken gives a wonderful colour to the roasted bird once
it comes out of the oven and it does something incredible to the flavour of the potatoes that are cooking in its juices. And rubbing the spices between the chicken skin infuses the meat with far more flavour... and for health reasons, you really should avoid the fat in chicken skin and use it simply to give chicken flavour while roating (and to prevent it from drying out), and then to add flavour to any chicken stock you might make later on, should you chose to do that from the left over carcass.

And one more word of caution: please, please, please be very careful with your hand washing when preparing a raw chicken carcass. Every time you touch the raw bird, wash your hands before touching anything else like a bowl or a utensil. Then once the bird is in the oven, carefully wash down all kitchen surfaces that might have come in contact with the bird or its juices. Then throw the towel in the laundry that you used to dry your hands. And do NOT prepare the bird on a wooden cutting board surface.

ingredients
1- 5 to 6 lb. whole chicken
1 & 1/4 t. sea salt, divided
1½ t. dried thyme, divided
1½ t. dried rosemary, divided
freshly ground pepper to taste
4 t. olive oil, divided
3 T. balsamic vinegar
1½ lbs. baby red or fingerling potatoes, halved (whole if fairly small)

instructions
Preheat oven to 400F. Line a roasting pan with foil.

Wash the chicken and pat it dry with paper towels, being sure to rinse out the cavity. Set the chicken on a rack in a roasting pan, (or directly on foil if you have no rack), breast facing up. Loosen the skin covering the breasts by putting your fingers between the skin and the meat, gently pulling up to create an air pocket between them. This is the space into which you will rub a spice mixture.

In a small bowl, combine one teaspoon each of salt, thyme & rosemary plus several grinds of black pepper. Rub half the oil over the chicken. Rub half the spice mixture directly onto the meat, underneath the skin that you have lifted. Rub the remaining spice mixture over the outside of the skin and inside the cavity. Drizzle vinegar all over the chicken & rub to coat evenly.

In a large mixing bowl, mix the potatoes with the remaining two teaspoons of oil, 1/4 t. salt and a half teaspoon each of thyme & rosemary. Season with pepper. Spread potatoes around the chicken in the roasting pan. Place the pan in the centre of the oven and cook for 45 minutes. Open the oven and loosely cover the chicken with foil to prevent over browning. Cook for 45 minutes more, until the juices run clear when pierced with a fork and the internal temperature of the breast meat is 160F (thigh meat should reach 170F).

Remove the roasting pan from the oven. Transfer chicken to a cutting boards & let rest for 10 minutes (the temperature of the breast meat will rise to 165F). Carve the chicken into slices & save the skin & bones for making soup stock. Serve with potatoes.

Recipe from Clean Eating, p. 16
Visit our website at http://www.swefm.ca
Like us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/swefm.ca
Contributed by Sheri Hendsbee

Tuesday, 24 September 2013

Fresh Sheet: September 25th Market



Sweet Stuff bakes many treats: including her popular mini cupcakes that come in plenty of flavours, an assortment of cookies and recently, pumpkin tarts. To celebrate autumn, for the last 2 markets (September 25th, and October 2nd) Lindsay is baking seasonal  pumpkin pies. What a delicious way to welcome the changing season, than with a fork full of pumpkin pie.


 

Smoky Valley Goat Cheese is a new vendor at our market this week bringing their wonderful farmstead cheeses... goat cheeses (think chèvre, feta, brie, valency and St. Maure) and artisan cow cheeses (think raclette, Cardiff with sun dried tomato, havarti, gruyere). Everything is done on the farm, from raising and milking the herd through to pasturizing the milk and making the cheese. Check out a video on Smoky Valley Cheese to learn more: http://vimeo.com/15335997

 



A.I.G Produce (Osoyoos) has many fresh apple varieties being picked from their fields in BC. This week, be on the look out for the near-famous honey crisp apple - known for being very crisp, sweet-tart and juicy. As well, GALA apples are on special, by the case load: $10 for 12 pounds of apples. Ambrosia, is another delicious variety that will be in stock. This home-grown originates from BC. It is a favourite amongst many for it's crispness, creamy colouring (with blush hues) and because it does not turn brown quickly, when sliced.


Andy's Finest Jerky was formed in late 2010 after its founder Andy discovered that his products were becoming ever increasingly popular. Starting from a small smoker in his backyard, Andy had supplied his product to family and friends and soon demand outstripped supply.  Andy's Finest Jerky make and offer for sale beef jerky made from AAA graded Alberta beef. Sliced and seasoned to perfection then naturally smoked to its finest. Flavors include: Original, teriyaki, peppered, hot & spicy, honey garlic. Be sure to stop by and ask for a sample

Riverbend Gardens surprised market goers at last week's market with BRUSSELS SPROUTS. Sure, not the favourite vegetable to everyone, but for those who love em - this time of season is a bounty of deliciousness! And not just any brussels sprouts: Riverbend Gardens sells theirs loaded on the stem. This a great way to learn more about how vegetables grow. Brussels Sprouts are in the brassica family, like kale, arugula and cabbage. Their flavour gets sweet with cool temperatures.

momstown will be back at the info tent doing a craft with young children who come to our market, so be sure to stop by and make a craft. This week is a super fun activity: reading a story called "Monsters DON'T EAT Broccoli" and making monsters!

Remember, if you see something on the lists below that you especially want to seek out, stop by the info tent. There we have a large map of the site that shows where vendors are located and we have volunteers who can direct you to help you find those treasured items.






Fresh vegetables & fruits in season, and available now at this week's market:
The BC fruit trucks are bringing a wealth of gorgeous fruit. This week expect to see:
  • Apples (Galas, Macs, Pink Ladies)
  • Dehydrated apples, sparkling cider, 100% pure apple juice 
  • Apricots
  • Blueberries
  • Cherries (dark cherries & yellow Rainers)
  • Concord grapes (the seedless wine grapes, small & dark & ever so flavour-filled)
  • Currants, red & black 
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Pears (green & red)
  • Plums (yellow & purple & Dinosaur's egg)
  • Raspberries
  • Saskatoons (fresh saskatoons are no longer available, but frozen ones are)
  • Strawberries
  • Watermellons 
As for veggies... they are now officially pouring in from the fields! Expect to see
  • Acorn Squash
  • Broccoli
  • Beans... yellow & green & purple, field & hothouse long (incredibly, the purple beans change colour when you steam them or plop them in boiling water, going from purple to green... the second they're green, they're done!)
  • Beets (red, purple, golden & striped candy cane)
  • Butternut squashes
  • Cabbages (green & purple, round and conical)
    Pie Pumpkins from Riverbend Gardens.
  • Carrots, classic orange as well as purple.
  • Cauliflower (white, purple, yellow and the wonderfully whimsical Romanesco)
  • Corn - sweet corn 
  • Cucumbers, field & hothouse, small pickling, small snacking, long English, round yellow, and large field cukes
  • Dill, long stalks & 00flowers (perfect for new potatoes & making dill pickles)
  • Eggplants (long purple & yellow and small green oriental)
  • Fava Beans
  • Fennel 
  • Garlic
  • Heirloom tomatoes
  • Herb plants (thyme, basil, oregano, parsley, mint, sage, rosemary, dill, sorrel)
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi (purple & green)
  • Lettuces (romaine, green leaf lettuce, red leaf lettuce, butter lettuce)
  • Leeks
  • Onions (large field onions, red onions, small spring onions, chives)
  • Pattypan Squashes (mini yellow or green squashes, great for sautéing) 
  • Peas
  • Peppers (small & large orange, yellow, red & green bell peppers, sweet thin-walled long red cubanelle peppers, red spicy chiles, mildly spicy green jalepeños, hot banana peppers, extremely hot wee little orange habeñeros)
  • Potatoes (golden, white, purple, red)... don't forget to pick up fresh dill to go with them.
  • Pie Pumpkins
  • Fresh garlic
  • Swiss chard (it comes in three colours: rhubarb red, peppermint stick pink and golden yellow)
  • Summer Squashes (Zucchini and yellow summer squashes)
  • Tomatoes, field & hothouse (large, small & on the vine red, the wonderfully flavourful & meaty green & red striped mini zebras, heirloom varieties, Romas, Big Uglies, etc.) 
PLUS
  • The Mallow Fellow is done for the season.
  • Delectable gourmet chocolate bars, truffles,  chocolate dipped marshmallows, cocoa covered almonds and pecan clusters from Violet Chocolates. 
  • Farmstead Cheeses made at an artisan cheesiry in Alberta (chevr, feta, harvarti and more).
  • A variety of artisan breads, cinnamon buns, cinnamon breads, pies, muffins, sweet loaves, gluten-free loaves & baking, cupcakes, bagels, homemade cookies, cakes & other finger-licking good baked treats throughout the market
  • Unbelievably authentic & delicious French style croissants (with chocolate inside, or with real raspberries)
  • Brioche with raisins & coconut palm sugar crumble or with orange blossom and a hint of anise or Gruyere and rosemary
  • A wide assortment of flavours of banana bread
  • Fresh & frozen meats (beef, bison, pork, chicken, lamb) 
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Jarred pickles (cucumber pickles, dill pickles, pickled eggs, pickled beets)
  • Dehydrated garlic powder
  • Fresh raw honey & bee pollen (Want to know more about bee pollen? Click here.)
  • Specialty gelatos (great in this blistering summer heat!) They're packed on dry ice at the market, so they easily make the trip home without melting.
  • Delightful bottles of Organic Fruit wines and mead.
  • Greek dips (humus, tzatziki, spicy feta & red pepper) and specialty Greek food items, like  Sagnaki (lightly breaded baked cheese, delicious served warm).
  • Turkish Foods (from savoury pastries and dinner items to sweet dessert treats) will not be available.
  • Korean Foods (green onion cakes, kimchi, bulgogi as ready to go meals )
  • Indian Foods (naan & butter chicken as ready to go meals, Samosas, Indian cookies & salty snacks)
  • Thai Foods (frozen & ready for your weekday meals)
  • Packages of spices ready for appetizer dips or wine slushes
  • AAA Alberta Beef Jerky
  • Jams & jellies & condiments to compliment everything from your toast through to your meats and fish
  • Sweet treats like cookies, mini cupcakes, snow cones & soft ice-cream to eat on the spot
  • Kettle Popcorn

 


  • Dazzling polished stones, minerals and crystals (It's in the Stones)   
  • Beautiful, one of a kind cheese platters made out of wine bottles (Shilo's Glass)
  • Specialty soap (Ada's Soap)
  • Jewellery this week (necklaces, earrings, bracelets from Jewels By Amy).
  • Bath & body items (lip balms, bath bombs, body creams)
  • Great seating, picnic tables, patio & deck furniture from BREEZESTA Patio Chairs
  • the ATM will be in the centre of the market, beside Yellowbird Food Truck, should you need access to a banking machine 



    • Due to the onset of chillier weather the slide will not be at the market till summer 2014.
    • The balloon busker will be at the market, creating lively, fun designs out of his rainbow of coloured balloons. 
    • The Dolphin Lady facepainter will be at the market, creating incredible works of art on wee little faces
    • momstown will be at the SWEFM Info tent doing crafts with the kids that they're sure to enjoy, free of charge. 
    • And as always, there are plenty of curbs and rocks to balance on along the avenue of trees that goes down the centre of our market!
     Come on out to the market for dinner. The food trucks will be on site, and you can grab a spot of shade under a tree (and perhaps even a spot at one of the highly coveted picnic tables, if you're lucky!) and then devour a scrumptious dinner. Choose from :
    • Sailin' On (vegan), 
    • Bully (gourmet comfort food) 
    • Yellow Bird (Japanese fusion) 
    • Fat Franks (gourmet hotdogs, sausages & smokies)
    • Butcher's Bus (sausage on a bun, pierogies & soft ice cream cones)
    • Pink Kernel (snow cones, mini donuts, popped carnival corn, cotton candy)
    Visit our website at http://www.swefm.ca
    Like us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/swefm.ca

    Contributed by Melisa Zapisocky

    Friday, 20 September 2013

    Recipe: Apple Sauce

    a few thoughts
    The wonderful thing about a fall farmers' market is that the produce just pours in. The tables of the fruit and veggie vendors' booths are heaping with beauty and colour, texture and variety... positively groaning under the weight of another successful Canadian local food harvest. It is an amazing sight to behold and it reminds me, once again, of the incredible good fortune we have to live in Canada where the food supply is not only safe and plentiful, but it is beautiful, nourishing and inspiring as well.

    When I was standing in front of the Red Apple booth a few markets ago taking photos for the market's facebook page, I happened upon a woman asking Janja about making applesauce. She wanted a particular weight of apples for the recipe that she was following, and the desire to get that weight just right showed that she was new to the whole experience of canning applesauce.

    I have been making applesauce for years and it is the simplest thing to make and can. You do not need a recipe as it is very, very, very simple and easy to do. Here are a few basic tips:
    • You want to choose an apple that is tart so that your applesauce has more flavour... I always choose macintosh apples as they're our family's favourites. 
      Applesauce can be unsweetened, like the one on
      the left, for baking or for people who do not have
      a sweet tooth, or it can be sweetened and flavoured
      with cinnamon, which accounts for the change
      in colour in the applesauce on the right.
    • When you buy apples at a farmers' market, there's a terrific chance that they do not come coated in waxy preserving residue, so for the purposes of these super simple instructions, only buy wax-less apples as you will not be peeling the apples.
    • Don't worry about unsightly blemishes in the skin. It is what's under the skin that matters.
    • Applesauce is a key ingredient in low-fat baking, allowing you to add moisture and replace a lot of the butter and oil with a wonderful tasting, low-fat alternative. So you can make this applesauce two ways: I usually make a batch of unsweetened applesauce for my baking, and a batch of slightly sweetened & cinnamon-ed applesauce for eating as a dessert or as a lunch snack in small, ziplock snack-sized containers. It can be frozen that way or canned traditionally using glass jars and a water bath. It's really up to you, and the amount of space you have in your freezer or pantry, but either way it tastes the same and has the same smooth consistency.
    • Don't worry about how many apples you buy as you can make this in multiple batches, one after the other, and process them in a canner once you've used them all up.
    • Once you start, I say, go all out. So buy a TON of apples and make the applesauce all in one go. That way the clean up only happens once. And you get into a rhythm of batches and find that it goes quite quickly and smoothly. And the tower of jars or containers, once you;re finished, is so very, very satisfying to behold!
    And now for the secret tool in my arsenal: a tomato press. Really! I purchased mine years ago at Lee
    Valley Tools (we have one here up at 184 Street, north of Stony Plain Road in Edmonton, but you can easily order them online and have them delivered to your door http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/page.aspx?p=44040&cat=2,2120). It is a relatively inexpensive addition to your canning kitchen (it costs under $40) and is easy to store. This is another one of those tricks that my dad taught me... being a woodworker, he LOVES Lee Valley Tools and they actually carry a wide assortment of inventive kitchen gadgets along with all of their high quality woodworking and gardening tools. The tomato press suction-cups onto your counter and easily removes the stems, peels, seeds and cores from the apples, pushing only the apple pulp out and into its catchment bowl. The result is that there is very, very little wasted apple and you get an applesauce with a wonderful, velvety, smooth & uniform consistency.

    Apples can be found at our market from three vendors: AIG Osoyoos, BC Fruit, Red Apple and Steve and Dan's Fresh BC Fruit. All are wonderful suppliers of a variety of apple cultivars.
    apple sauce
    Less than a recipe, this is simply a method, so bare with me. There's nothing exact here. It can be made in multiple batches without even washing the pot because there is no sugar... just apples & water... used. So there's no burning. No sticking! And no stirring! The only thing I can say is...  You have GOT to try this! It is so easy!
    ingredients
    tart apples, a whole bunch
    water, a wee bit
    cinnamon (optional)
    white or brown sugar, honey or agave syrup (optional)
    instructions
    Wash your apples. Without peeling them, quarter them, leaving the stems, cores & seeds in place. This quite literally takes only a few seconds!

    Select a large, wide pot. Put in enough apple quarters to fill the pot to a depth of about 2-3 layers of apples. Add water until it is about 1/4 of an inch deep. Cover with a tight fitting lid. Bring the water to a boil.

    Take a peak. The apples will be done when they are steamed to the point where they sort of swell & mush and the peels start to curl back. This only takes about 5 minutes. If the liquid dries up, add more water.

    Ladle apples into the tomato press and crank the handle, adding more apples as necessary to keep the hopper topped up. The residue that comes out the side I usually pass through a second time to get every last bit of appley goodness out of the batch. You will be so surprised when you see how little, and how dry, the compostable waste is at the end!

    If you are making unsweetened applesauce, you are done. Ladle into jars for the water canner, or ladle into plastic containers or jars for the freezer. If canning, give them a hot water canning bath for 10 minutes at a full rolling bottle. Remove and cool to room temperature, refrigerating any jars whose seals do not "pop" into a tight fit. If freezing, simply pop them in the freezer once they have cooled to room temperature.

    If you are sweetening your applesauce, simply stir in your choice of sweetener... white sugar, brown sugar or honey, one tablespoon at a time, tasting frequently until it suits your palette. If you are adding cinnamon, do the same, half a teaspoon at a time. Then can or freeze as above.

    Visit our website at http://www.swefm.ca
    Like us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/swefm.ca
    Contributed by Sheri Hendsbee

    Tuesday, 17 September 2013

    Fresh Sheet: September 18th Market



     SWEFM Harvest Celebration and Plant a Row, Grow a Row are teaming up to bring fresh, healthy nutrient-dense produce to the storage vaults of Edmonton's Food Bank.  Join our Harvest Celebration, September 18th, when you can dust the dirt off of those freshly picked items from your own garden and bring them to the market to help us fill a truck. Don't garden, but still want to participate. Come visit our vendors who have heaps of fresh produce for you to purchase and donate. As always, the Food Bank takes non-perishable items as well.



    MAGIC by MARTY
    is a local magician who has been performing all things magic, and illusions since 1990. Magic by Marty will be at the market performing his "walk around magic." Be on the look out for rabbits being pulled out of hats, disappearing coins, card tricks and more. Magic by Marty will have magic for the young, and the young at heart. 




     The Mallow Fellow...this is Crystal's last week at SWEFM for the remainder of the market season. Not to disappoint, Crystal has outdone herself, yet again with new and more flavours of home made marshmallows. Stop by her booth to judge for yourself - delicious flavours like toasted coconut, chocolate covered toffee mallows, blue-raspberry, bubblegum, pumpkin pie, vanilla and root beer. 



    Birds and Bees Organic Fruit Wine and Mead are back at the market this week! Very exciting, as Zee has been away for the past few weeks. Now's a suitable time to stock your cupboards with the delightful tastes of summer months, only fermented! Birds and Bees is Alberta's only organic fruit winery and meadery (mead is made from honey). The Chrapko Family grows the berries and makes the fruit wine. Enjoy delightful varieties ranging on the sweeter side, like Saskatoon Berry and Hard Core Apple to those more dry, like Little Flirt Rhubarb and the Big Teaser Rhubarb.
    momstown will be back at the info tent doing a craft with the
    young children who come to our market, so be sure to stop by and make a craft - this week for harvest celebration: APPLE TREES!

    Remember, if you see something on the lists below that you especially want to seek out, stop by the info tent. There we have a large map of the site that shows where vendors are located and we have volunteers who can direct you to help you find those treasured items.






    Fresh vegetables & fruits in season, and available now at this week's market:
    The BC fruit trucks are bringing a wealth of gorgeous fruit. This week expect to see:
    Watermelon from Dargatz!
    • Apples (Galas, Macs, Pink Ladies)
    • Dehydrated apples, sparkling cider, 100% pure apple juice 
    • Apricots
    • Blueberries
    • Cherries (dark cherries & yellow Rainers)
    • Concord grapes (the seedless wine grapes, small & dark & ever so flavour-filled)
    • Currants, red & black 
    • Nectarines
    • Peaches
    • Pears (green & red)
    • Plums (yellow & purple & Dinosaur's egg)
    • Raspberries
    • Saskatoons (fresh saskatoons are no longer available, but frozen ones are)
    • Strawberries
    • Watermellons 
    As for veggies... they are now officially pouring in from the fields! Expect to see
    • Acorn Squash
    • Broccoli
    • Beans... yellow & green & purple, field & hothouse long (incredibly, the purple beans change colour when you steam them or plop them in boiling water, going from purple to green... the second they're green, they're done!)
    • Beets (red, purple, golden & striped candy cane)
    • Butternut squashes
      numerous kinds, shapes and
      coloured onions
    • Cabbages (green & purple, round and conical)
    • Carrots, classic orange as well as purple.
    • Cauliflower (white, purple, yellow and the wonderfully whimsical Romanesco)
    • Corn - sweet corn 
    • Cucumbers, field & hothouse, small pickling, small snacking, long English, round yellow, and large field cukes
    • Dill, long stalks & flowers (perfect for new potatoes & making dill pickles)
    • Eggplants (long purple & yellow and small green oriental)
    • Fava Beans
    • Fennel 
      Big Beauties! Perfect for Salsa, BLTs
      and sauce.
    • Garlic
    • Heirloom tomatoes
    • Herb plants (thyme, basil, oregano, parsley, mint, sage, rosemary, dill, sorrel)
    • Kale
    • Kohlrabi (purple & green)
    • Lettuces (romaine, green leaf lettuce, red leaf lettuce, butter lettuce)
    • Leeks
    • Onions (large field onions, red onions, small spring onions, chives)
    • Pattypan Squashes (mini yellow or green squashes, great for sautéing) 
    • Peas
    • Peppers (small & large orange, yellow, red & green bell peppers, sweet thin-walled long red cubanelle peppers, red spicy chiles, mildly spicy green jalepeños, hot banana peppers, extremely hot wee little orange habeñeros)
    • Potatoes (golden, white, purple, red)... don't forget to pick up fresh dill to go with them.
    • Fresh garlic
    • Swiss chard (it comes in three colours: rhubarb red, peppermint stick pink and golden yellow)
    • Summer Squashes (Zucchini and yellow summer squashes)
    • Tomatoes, field & hothouse (large, small & on the vine red, the wonderfully flavourful & meaty green & red striped mini zebras, heirloom varieties, Romas, Big Uglies, etc.) 
    PLUS
    • Simply Supper is not at the market in September. Visit her store on Rabbit Hill Road.
    • Delectable gourmet chocolate bars, truffles,  chocolate dipped marshmallows, cocoa covered almonds and pecan clusters from Violet Chocolates. 
    • The Mallow Fellow is back at the Market (last time this season) with home made, marshmallows.
    • A variety of artisan breads, cinnamon buns, cinnamon breads, pies, muffins, sweet loaves, gluten-free loaves & baking, cupcakes, bagels, homemade cookies, cakes & other finger-licking good baked treats throughout the market
    • Unbelievably authentic & delicious French style croissants (with chocolate inside, or with real raspberries)
    • Brioche with raisins & coconut palm sugar crumble or with orange blossom and a hint of anise
    • A wide assortment of flavours of banana bread
    • Fresh & frozen meats (beef, bison, pork, chicken, lamb) 
    • Farm-fresh eggs
    • Jarred pickles (cucumber pickles, dill pickles, pickled eggs, pickled beets)
    • Dehydrated garlic powder
    • Fresh raw honey & bee pollen (Want to know more about bee pollen? Click here.)
    • Specialty gelatos (great in this blistering summer heat!) They're packed on dry ice at the market, so they easily make the trip home without melting.
    • Delightful bottles of Organic Fruit wines and mead.
    • Greek dips (humus, tzatziki, spicy feta & red pepper) and specialty Greek food items, like  Sagnaki (lightly breaded baked cheese, delicious served warm).
    • Turkish Foods (from savoury pastries and dinner items to sweet dessert treats) will not be available.
    • Korean Foods (green onion cakes, kimchi, bulgogi as ready to go meals )
    • Indian Foods (naan & butter chicken as ready to go meals, Samosas, Indian cookies & salty snacks)
    • Thai Foods (frozen & ready for your weekday meals)
    • Packages of spices ready for appetizer dips or wine slushes
    • Smoked meats (sausages, pepperonis, sandwich meats, jerkies)
    • Jams & jellies & condiments to compliment everything from your toast through to your meats and fish
    • Sweet treats like cookies, mini cupcakes, snow cones & soft ice-cream to eat on the spot
    • Kettle Popcorn

     



    • Jewellery this week (necklaces, earrings, bracelets from Jewels By Amy).
    • Local author Lynn Link, with her fantastic novels that take place on the prairies.
    • Bath & body items (lip balms, bath bombs, body creams)
    • Beautiful, one of a kind cheese platters made out of wine bottles (Shilo's Glass)
    • Specialty soap (Ada's Soap is back)
    • Great seating, picnic tables, patio & deck furniture from BREEZESTA Patio Chairs
    • the ATM will be in the centre of the market, beside Yellowbird Food Truck, should you need access to a banking machine 



    • Barring high winds (forecasted at over 25km/hr and wild weather, the inflatable slide will be BACK on site 
    • The balloon busker will be at the market, creating lively, fun designs out of his rainbow of coloured balloons. 
    • The Dolphin Lady facepainter will be at the market, creating incredible works of art on wee little faces
    • momstown will be at the SWEFM Info tent doing crafts with the kids that they're sure to enjoy, free of charge. 
    • And as always, there are plenty of curbs and rocks to balance on along the avenue of trees that goes down the centre of our market!
     Come on out to the market for dinner. The food trucks will be on site, and you can grab a spot of shade under a tree (and perhaps even a spot at one of the highly coveted picnic tables, if you're lucky!) and then devour a scrumptious dinner. Choose from :
    • Sailin' On (vegan), 
    • Bully (gourmet comfort food) 
    • Yellow Bird (Japanese fusion) 
    • Fat Franks (gourmet hotdogs, sausages & smokies)
    • Butcher's Bus (sausage on a bun, pierogies & soft ice cream cones)
    • Pink Kernel (snow cones, mini donuts, popped carnival corn, cotton candy)
    Visit our website at http://www.swefm.ca
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    Contributed by Melisa Zapisocky

    Friday, 13 September 2013

    Recipe: Roasted Heirloom Tomato Soup


    There's nothing sweeter than a tomato left to ripen
    fully before being harvested & brought to market.
    a few thoughts 
    There is something truly wondrous about the fall harvest.

    There are many varieties of cherry tomatoes available
    at the market at this time of year, like these from
    TR Greenhouses.
    More than just being amazed by the towering piles of produce that come, overflowing the tables and spilling out into the aisles of farmers' markets, I revel in the stunning beauty of it all... the colours that are everywhere, the diversity of shapes & textures that make incredible displays on the tables, and the pride behind the smiles and faces of the farmers & growers as they stand behind their tables, answer questions for their customers and sell their bounty.... the variety of the fall harvest in Alberta is truly amazing.

    There's nothing I like more than sampling the abundance and variety of tomatoes that are available at a local farmers' market at this time of year. I have a soft spot for colour, variety and beauty... and tomatoes have it all.

    Chocolate cherry tomatoes turn brown when ripe
    In the past five years or so there has been a resurgence of interest in reviving the heirloom tomato varieties... those plants of old that may not have the shelf life of a roma tomato, the durability and perfect shape of a field tomato, or the guaranteed unblemished skin of a campari, but those old fashioned varieties are at the root of all commercially viable supermarket tomatoes today. And their flavours are incredible.

    The heirloom varieties of tomatoes hold endless fascination for me. They come in such a wide assortment of colours, from reds and browns and oranges through to pinks and strange looking ones with lines, blotches and bizarre shapes. There are the fun stripes of a green & red zebra tomato, the incredible sweetness and brilliant hue of a bright yellow golden boy and the wonderful texture and juiciness of a chocolate cherry tomato. And they rarely have a predictably uniform size, and some don't even have a predictable shape.

    Dargatz Family Farm has a wealth of tomato varieties...
    Just look at all the cherry tomato types they have!
    Tomatoes are available at a number of vendors at our market. Dargatz Family Farm specializes in the strange and wonderful world of heirloom varieties. Earlier in the season, Colin and Keith Dargatz showed me a spectacular fireworks tomato that had a yellow splattering across the top of the red and orange skin that looked like a fireworks eruption. It was beautiful! Stop by and talk to Keith and Colin and they'll fill you in on the fascinating details of the heirloom world that they love.

    TR Greenhouses and Dargatz Family Farm have an assortment of cherry tomatoes in a rainbow of colours. Holden Colony has both field ripened and greenhouse grown tomato varieties. And Riverbend Gardens started bringing their field tomatoes to market last week for the first time.
    Raw ingredients for a fantastic soup

    The recipe that follows is adapted from the Soup Sisters Cookbook, one of my favourite cookbooks. Soup Sisters is a non-profit organization that is dedicated to providing comfort to women and children in need through the making, sharing and donating of soup to domestic abuse shelters. It has 12 chapters across Canada and the United States, and with this cookbook, they have called upon a star studded line up of Canadian Chefs, like Bonnie Stern & Elizabeth Baird to create and donate recipes to their cookbook. The result is a tremendous volume of amazing soups, and a portion of the proceeds from the sale of the book go toward supporting the ongoing work of Soup Sisters.

    Roasted heirloom tomato soup
    Heirloom tomatoes come in many shapes, sizes, textures, colours and flavours. Making this soup is a great excuse to experiment and buy a whole assortment. Their textures vary widely and it can be a lot of fun trying all the different kinds. You can also top this soup with a sprig of the herb of your choice… parley, basil, thyme or oregano. You'll be surprised how thick, creamy, hearty & satisfying this soup can be without the addition of cream, yogurt, grains or lentils.
    I used chocolate cherry tomatoes in this batch
    exclusively, which is why it has such a strange colour.
    But the flavour was incredible! Sweet & incredibly intense!

    ingredients
    2 lbs. assorted heirloom tomatoes, halved
    1 onion, quartered
    2 T. olive oil
    10 fresh basil leaves
    3 fresh sage leaves
    1 sprig fresh oregano, leaves only
    3 mild green jalepeños
    1-2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
    1 T. balsamic vinegar
    1/2 t. salt
    pepper to taste
    1/3 c. freshly grated parmesan as a garnish

    instructions
    Big Uglies, an heirloom variety, at TR Greenhouses' stall
    1. Preheat your oven to 375F. Line a large, rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. 
    2. Toss the tomatoes & onions with the olive oil and spread out in a single layer on the baking sheet. Roast until slightly browned, about 45 minutes.
    3. Add the basil, sage, oregano and jalepenos to the tomato mixture. Purée until smooth either in a food processor or blender, or in a stock pot with an immersion blender (my choice, making clean up swift and easy!). 
    4. Place the tomato mixture in a stock pot, and add enough stock to give it a soupy consistency. The amount of stock used will change from batch to batch depending on the texture and juciness of the tomato varieties that you use.
    5. Bring the soup to a simmer over medium heat. Add the balsamic vinegar, and the salt and pepper to taste.
    6. Beefsteak Heirloom Tomatoes
      from TR Greenhouses
    7. Ladle up a bowl of soup and garnish with a dusting of parmesan cheese & a sprig of your favourite fresh herb. Mmmmm.
    Recipe adapted from The Soup Sisters Cookbook: 100 Simple Recipes to Warm Hearts One Bowl At A Time, page 167, edited by Sharon Hapton
    www.soupsisters.org
    Visit our website at http://www.swefm.ca
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    Contributed by Sheri Hendsbee